Replacing a Human Agent by an Automatic Reverse Directory Service

  • Géza Németh
  • Csaba Zainkó
  • Géza Kiss
  • Gábor Olaszy
  • László Fekete
  • Domokos Tóth

Agents who answer the calls in a reverse directory service have to face a considerable challenge: they need to communicate proper names (such as the names of persons, companies and streets). Their pronunciation is frequently irregular and their spelling is not obvious. The authors developed a TTS specialized for this task, i.e. the reading of names and addresses in order to create an automatic reverse directory service. The novelty of our system compared to others developed earlier is that we employed a new reading mode and optimized the acoustic database based on an extensive analysis of Hungarian proper names. This resulted in high intelligibility and naturalness. Our system was launched as a service of T-Mobile Hungary. The specialized TTS can also be the basis of other applications in the future, such as location based services.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Géza Németh
    • 1
  • Csaba Zainkó
    • 1
  • Géza Kiss
    • 1
  • Gábor Olaszy
    • 1
  • László Fekete
  • Domokos Tóth
  1. 1.Department of Telecommunications and Media InformaticsBudapest University of Technology and EconomicsHungary

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