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Abstract

Those most hopeful about the consequences of contact range from millenarians who expect that extraterrestrials will guide us toward utopia to moderate optimists who simply hope for a net gain from contact. Here are some common themes.

Keywords

Advanced Civilization Deep Time Alien Civilization Utopian Vision Darwinian Revolution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael A. G. Michaud

There are no affiliations available

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