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Autonomy and Its Role in Learning

  • Philip Benson
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 15)

Abstract

This chapter discusses the development of the concept of autonomy in ELT and makes particular reference to its role in helping teachers come to terms with changing landscapes of teaching and learning. It then goes on to outline what we know about autonomy and its implementation to date and to discuss three current issues of concern: the social character of autonomy, learners’ knowledge of the learning process, and teacher autonomy. The chapter concludes by indicating possible future developments in the field.

Keywords

Language Learning Language Teaching Personal Autonomy Metacognitive Knowledge Learner Autonomy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip Benson
    • 1
  1. 1.The Hong Kong Institute of EducationChina

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