3D Player Testing in Tennis

  • Simon Choppin
  • Simon Goodwill
  • Stephen Haake

Abstract

Although qualitative shot analysis and rudimentary 2D player testing has been performed in the past, a comprehensive 3D study has yet to be done. This paper outlines a method that has been used to record player baseline shots and serves in 3D. The method allows accurate tracking of racket velocity (any point on racquet), ball velocity, impact instant, impact position, and all associated angular velocities. Details of the methodology used in obtaining recorded shots are described, as well as the planar/vector calculations used to obtain the required information from the recordings. The movement of racket and ball were considered just prior to, and post impact, but testing is not limited to this case. Two Phantom high speed cameras were used in the analysis at 1000 frames per second. To date, testing has been performed on recreational, to county level players with a mind to extend the testing in the future to world ranked professional players.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simon Choppin
    • 1
  • Simon Goodwill
    • 2
  • Stephen Haake
    • 2
  1. 1.Sports Engineering Research GroupUniversity of SheffieldSheffield
  2. 2.Sports Engineering, CSESSheffield Hallam UniversitySheffield

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