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Coca and Poppy Eradication in Colombia: Environmental and Human Health Assessment of Aerially Applied Glyphosate

  • Keith R. Solomon
  • Arturo Anadón
  • Gabriel Carrasquilla
  • Antonio L. Cerdeira
  • E. J. P. Marshall
  • Luz-Helena Sanin
Part of the Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology book series (RECT, volume 190)

Abstract

It is estimated that some 200 million people worldwide use illicit drugs. Most of these drugs have natural origins, such as cannabis, cocaine, and the opiates; however, the synthetic drugs such as the amphetamines also comprise a significant proportion of these uses (UNODC 2003). In response to the socioeconomic impacts of the production and distribution of illicit drugs, a number of individual nations, as well as multinational organizations, have initiated programs to reduce and eventually eliminate their production and distribution (UNODC 2003).

Keywords

Eradication Program Glyphosate Application Agricultural Health Study Arch Environ Contam Toxicol Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith R. Solomon
    • 1
  • Arturo Anadón
    • 3
  • Gabriel Carrasquilla
    • 4
  • Antonio L. Cerdeira
    • 2
  • E. J. P. Marshall
    • 5
  • Luz-Helena Sanin
    • 6
    • 7
  1. 1.Centre for Toxicology and Department of Environmental BiologyUniversity of GuelphGuelphCanada
  2. 2.Ministry of AgricultureEMBRAPAJaguariuna, SPBrazil
  3. 3.Departamento de Toxicología y Farmacología, Facultad de VeterinariaUniversidad Complutense de MadridMadridSpain
  4. 4.Fundación Santa Fe de BogotáHospital UniversitarioBogotá
  5. 5.Marshall Agroecology LimitedSomersetUK
  6. 6.Department of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  7. 7.National Institute of Public HealthAutonomous University of ChihuahuaMexico

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