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Design Rationale of the Pure Object-Oriented Embedded Operating System

  • Friedrich Schön
  • Wolfgang Schröder-Preikschat
  • Olaf Spinczyk
  • Ute Spinczyk
Part of the IFIP — The International Federation for Information Processing book series (IFIPAICT, volume 25)

Abstract

The PURE project aims at providing a portable, universal runtime executive for deeply embedded parallel/distributed systems. The phrase “deeply embedded” refers to systems forced to operate under extreme resource constraints in terms of memory, CPU, and power consumption. The notion “parallel/distributed” relates to the fact that embedded systems are becoming more and more complex in terms of architectural viewpoints. This paper discusses design issues of a family-based, object-oriented operating system targeting the area of deeply embedded systems in the above-mentioned sense. It is shown that a modular system consisting of a large number of reusable abstractions can be compiled to a fairly small and compact entity.

Keywords

Design Rationale Clock Cycle Embed System Active Object Object Orientation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Friedrich Schön
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wolfgang Schröder-Preikschat
    • 1
  • Olaf Spinczyk
    • 1
  • Ute Spinczyk
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MagdeburgMagdeburgGermany
  2. 2.GMD FIRSTBerlinGermany

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