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Abstract

The ATF Calculus is a kernel language for wide-area network programming languages, with atomic failure semantics as its central organizing principle.

Keywords

Wide-area network programming fault tolerance atomic failure 

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Copyright information

© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dominic Duggan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceStevens Institute of TechnologyHobokenUSA

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