Can Common Sense uncover cultural differences in computer applications?

  • Junia Anacleto
  • Henry Lieberman
  • Marie Tsutsumi
  • Vânia Neris
  • Aparecido Carvalho
  • Jose Espinosa
  • Muriel Godoi
  • Silvia Zem-Mascarenhas
Part of the IFIP International Federation for Information Processing book series (IFIPAICT, volume 217)

Abstract

Cultural differences play a very important role in matching computer interfaces to the expectations of users from different national and cultural backgrounds. But to date, there has been little systematic research as to the extent of such differences, and how to produce software that automatically takes into account these differences. We are studying these issues using a unique resource: Common Sense knowledge bases in different languages. Our research points out that this kind of knowledge can help computer systems to consider cultural differences. We describe our experiences with knowledge bases containing thousands of sentences describing people and everyday activities, collected from volunteer Web contributors in three different cultures: Brazil, Mexico and the USA, and software which automatically searches for cultural differences amongst the three cultures, alerting the user to potential differences.

References

  1. 1.
    Anacleto, J.; Lieberman, H; Tsutsumi, M.; Neris, V.; Carvalho, A.; Espinosa, J.; Zem-Mascarenhas, S. Using Common Sense to Recognize Cultural Differences. Submitted as a work-in-progress paper to CHI 2006.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bailey, B.P., Gurak, L.J., and Konstan, J.A. An examination of trust production in computer-mediated exchange. Proc. 7th Human Factors and the Web 2001 Conference www.optavia.com/hfweb/7thconferenceproceedings.zip/bailey.pdf. Last visited in Jan, 06.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Birukov, A., Blanzieri, E, Giorgini, P. Implicit: An AgentBased Recommendation System for Web Search. Proc. AAMAS’05 (July 25–29, 2005, Utrecht, Netherlands).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Choi, B., Lee, I., Kim, J., Jeon, Y. A Qualitative Cross-National Study of Cultural Influences on Mobile Data Service Design. Proc. CHI 2005.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Cohen, William W. WHIRL: A word-based information representation language. Artificial Intelligence (2000) 163–196.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Falkenhainer, B., Gentner, D. The Structure-Mapping Engine. Proceedings of the Fifth National Conference on Artificial Intelligence. (1986) Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Khaslavsky, J. Integrating Culture into Interface Design. Proc CHI 1998 p 365–366.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Lieberman, L., Liu, H., Singh, P., Barry, B. Beating Common Sense into Interactive Applications. American Association for Artificial Intelligence, Winter 2005, p 63–76Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Liu, Hugo. MontyLingua: An End-to-End Natural Language Processor for English. (2003)Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Liu, Hugo and Singh, Push. OMCSNet: A Commonsense Inference Toolkit. MIT Media Lab Society Of Mind Group Technical Report SOM02-01. (2002) 272–277.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Liu, H.; Singh, P. Commonsense Reasoning in and over Natural Language. Proc. 8th KES 04. http://web.media.mit.edu/~push/CommonsenseInOverNL.pdf. Last visited in Jan, 06.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Liu, H; Singh P. ConceptNet: A Practical Commonsense Reasoning Toolkit. BT Technology Journal, v. 22, n. 4, p. 211–226, 2004. http://web.media.mit.edu/~push/ConceptNet-BTTJ.pdf. Last visited in Jan, 06.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Marcus, A. Culture Class vs. Culture Clash. Proc. Interactions 2002 (June, 2002), 25 p.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Singh, P. The Open Mind Commonsense Project. KurzweilAI.net, 2002. Available in: <http://web.media.mit.edu/~push/OMCSProject.pdf>. Last visited in Jan, 06.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Spink, A., Ozmutlu S., Ozmutlu H., Jansen B. J. U.S. VERSUS EUROPEAN WEB SEARCHING TRENDS. SIGIR Forum. Fall 2002, Vol. 36, No. 2, p 32–38Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Teevan, J., Dumais, S. T., Horvitz, E. Personalizing Search via Automated Analysis of Interests and Activities. Proc. SIGIR’ 05 (August 15–19, 2005, Salvador, Brazil).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© International Federation for Information Processing 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Junia Anacleto
    • 1
  • Henry Lieberman
    • 2
  • Marie Tsutsumi
    • 1
  • Vânia Neris
    • 1
  • Aparecido Carvalho
    • 1
  • Jose Espinosa
    • 2
  • Muriel Godoi
    • 1
  • Silvia Zem-Mascarenhas
    • 1
  1. 1.Advanced Interaction Laboratory - LIAUFSCarSao Carlos — SPBrazil
  2. 2.MIT Media LaboratoryCambridge

Personalised recommendations