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Distributed Algorithms for Autonomous Mobile Robots

  • Giuseppe Prencipe
  • Nicola Santoro
Part of the IFIP International Federation for Information Processing book series (IFIPAICT, volume 209)

Abstract

The distributed coordination and control of a team of autonomous mobile robots is a problem widely studied in a variety of fields, such as engineering, artificial intelligence, artificial life, robotics. Generally, in these areas, the problem is studied mostly from an empirical point of view. Recently, a significant research effort has been and continues to be spent on understanding the fundamental algorithmic limitations on what a set of autonomous mobile robots can achieve. In particular, the focus is to identify the minimal robot capabilities (sensorial, motorial, computational) that allow a problem to be solvable and a task to be performed. In this paper we describe the current investigations on the interplay between robots capabilities, computability, and algorithmic solutions of coordination problems by autonomous mobile robots.

Keywords

Mobile Robot Local Coordinate System Destination Point Autonomous Mobile Robot Limited Visibility 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© International Federation for Information Processing 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Giuseppe Prencipe
    • 1
  • Nicola Santoro
    • 2
  1. 1.Dipartimento di InformaticaUniversità di PisaPisaItaly
  2. 2.School of Computer ScienceCarleton UniversityCarletonCanada

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