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Abstract

It is hard to imagine a field as different from sociology as neuroscience. The differences in theory, method, tradition, and practice could readily breed antagonism between any two fields. However, it is just because of these differences that neuroscience has been able to present important findings about covert brain processes that can expand sociological theory. Traditionally, sociological social psychology has focused on self-consciousness and language as primary mechanisms of human adaptation. This focus might be appropriate to the cerebral image of the human animal, but neuroscience has produced evidence that emotional capacities underlie the intelligence implied by this image and indeed make it possible (Carter and Pasqualini 2004; Damasio 1994).

Keywords

Brain Stem Emotional Process Limbic System Skin Conductance Response Social Perspective 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • David D. Franks
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologyVirginia Commonwealth UniversityRichmond

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