Grief

  • Kathy Gharmaz
  • Melinda J. Milligan

Abstract

In Western societies, most people define grief as the emotion elicited by involuntary loss. Loss gives rise to grief and the varied emotions included in grief. We associate grief with death of a person with whom the individual has intimate ties; however, people may grieve over other kinds of losses and, in some situations and societies, death of a close friend or family member does not always elicit grief.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathy Gharmaz
    • 1
  • Melinda J. Milligan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologySonoma State UniversityRohnert Park

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