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Why Crying Improves Our Well-being: An Attachment-Theory Perspective on the Functions of Adult Crying

  • Michelle C.P. Hendriks
  • Judith K. Nelson
  • Randolph R. Cornelius
  • Ad J.J.M. Vingerhoets

Keywords

Attachment Theory Social Reaction Attachment Behavior Social Message Eastern Psychological Association 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michelle C.P. Hendriks
  • Judith K. Nelson
  • Randolph R. Cornelius
  • Ad J.J.M. Vingerhoets

There are no affiliations available

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