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Modelling for Life: Mathematics and Children’s Experience

  • Brian Greer
  • Lieven Verschaffel
  • Swapna Mukhopadhyay
Part of the New ICMI Study Series book series (NISS, volume 10)

Abstract

We make the case for introducing fundamental ideas about modelling early, in particular through reconceptualizing word problems that describe real-world situations as exercises in modelling. Further, we argue for modelling as a means of giving children a sense of agency through recognizing the potential of mathematics as a critical tool for analysis of issues important in their lives.

Keywords

Mathematics Education Word Problem African American Student Mortgage Loan Critical Tool 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian Greer
    • 1
  • Lieven Verschaffel
    • 2
  • Swapna Mukhopadhyay
    • 3
  1. 1.Graduate School of EducationPortland State UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Center for Instructional Psychology and TechnologyUniversity of LeuvenBelgium
  3. 3.Department of Curriculum and InstructionPortland State UniversityUSA

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