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Conclusion

This chapter has outlined a cognitive model of low self-esteem and a cognitive-behavioral treatment program based upon it. It has considered the value of independent self-help assignments (homework) at each stage in therapy, and concluded by identifying practical issues that need to be taken into account when working to enhance self-esteem.

Our overall aim in working with clients who do not value themselves is to help them to create more realistic and flexible standards for themselves, and to establish a stance that acknowledges inevitable human weakness and frailty without condemning it, and without losing a fundamental underlying sense of self-acceptance. Homework is central to this endeavor, because it means that new learning escapes the confines of the consulting room and finds opportunities to flourish in the real world.

Keywords

Personality Disorder Cognitive Model Cognitive Therapy Homework Assignment Case Material 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Melanie J. V. Fennell

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