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Introduction: East Asian Social Movements

  • Jeffrey Broadbent
Chapter
Part of the Nonprofit and Civil Society Studies book series (NCSS)

Abstract

The licensed prostitutes of Taiwan kept to themselves, out of the public eye. They worked in a ramshackle part of Taipei, in old wooden two-story pre-war buildings. They did not particularly like their work, but they were aging and it was the only trade they knew. Impoverished and social pariahs, they were still proud of their independence. Their legal status kept them from the exploiting clutches of pimps in the illegal prostitution trade. But when a proposed law threatened to make their work illegal, despite their marginal social status, they suddenly erupted into public protest. Once mobilized and launched, the movement’s goals expanded from legal rights to gaining public respect. Going further, they demanded protection for the rights of all sex workers. In Taipei, the movement hosted marches with banners and public festivals to bolster public support for sex-worker rights. These rallies drew international attention, with visits and participation by foreign sex-worker campaigners. The movement found considerable sympathy from sectors of the public and from the labor movement, itself so recently liberated from martial law.

Keywords

Civil Society Social Movement Political Opportunity Confucian Ethic Protest Movement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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