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School Experience During Pre-Service Teacher Education from the Students’ Perspective

  • Merrilyn Goos
  • B. Arvold
  • N. Bednarz
  • L. DeBlois
  • J. Maheux
  • F. Morselli
  • J. Proulx
Part of the New ICMI Study Series book series (NISS, volume 11)

A challenge for teacher education is to understand how pre-service teachers learn from experience in multiple contexts–especially when their own schooling, the university methods course, and their practicum experiences can produce conflicting images of teaching. This chapter examines how pre-service teachers interpret their school experiences in the light of their university pre-service courses, their personal histories, knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes, and the specific constraints of the school environment.

Keywords

Teacher Education Teacher Education Program School Experience Novice Teacher Mathematics Teacher Education 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Merrilyn Goos
    • 1
  • B. Arvold
  • N. Bednarz
  • L. DeBlois
  • J. Maheux
  • F. Morselli
  • J. Proulx
  1. 1.University of QueenslandAustralia

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