Assessment of Mindfulness

  • Ruth A Baer
  • Erin Walsh
  • Emily L B Lykins

Mindfulness-based interventions have been developed for a wide range of problems, disorders, and populations and are increasingly available in a variety of settings. Empirically supported interventions that are based on or incorporate mindfulness training include acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT; Hayes, Strosahl, & Wilson 1999), dialectical behavior therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993), mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT; Segal, Williams, & Teasdale, 2002), and mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR; Kabat-Zinn, 1982, 1990). Variations on these approaches, including integration of mindfulness training into individual psychotherapy from diverse perspectives, also have been described (Germer, Siegel, & Fulton, 2005).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ruth A Baer
    • 1
  • Erin Walsh
  • Emily L B Lykins
  1. 1.University of Kentucky

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