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Eating Disorders

  • David H. GleavesEmail author
  • Janet D. LatnerEmail author
  • Suman AmbwaniEmail author
Chapter

Eating problems or irregularities are common among children and adolescents. When the problems reach the point of being gross disturbances in eating behavior and when accompanied by some form of body image disturbance, we enter the realm of the Eating Disorders (EDs). The current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM—IV—TR; APA, 2000) distinguishes between three primary ED types: Anorexia Nervosa (AN), Bulimia Nervosa (BN), and Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS). The latter refers to cases that meet some but not all the criteria required for the diagnosis of either AN or BN. Binge-Eating Disorder (BED) is a more recently recognized disorder that is technically a variant of the EDNOS category (although research criteria have been developed). There are, however, numerous possible manifestations of EDNOS other than BED.

In earlier versions of the DSM, up to and including the Third Edition—Revised (American Psychiatric Association, 1987), the EDs were listed within the Disorders Usually First Evident in Infancy, Childhood, or Adolescence section. Given their prominence among adults as well, their own section was created in the most recent edition. However, their origins in childhood or adolescence should not be forgotten and they are, in many ways, disorders of adolescence.

Keywords

Anorexia NERVOSA Eating Disorder Binge Eating Bulimia NERVOSA Family Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of CanterburyChristchurchNew Zealand
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Hawaii at ManoaHonolulu
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyDickinson CollegeCarlisle

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