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Biological Agents and Terror Medicine

  • Meir Oren
Chapter
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In the last decade, terror has become an increasingly global problem. More people have become radicalized, the know-how to use weapons of mass destruction (WMD) is easily accessible by Internet and electronic media, and precursors and basic ingredients are easily purchased. Terrorists are innovative and we now face a new era of nonconventional terrorism: chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear (CBRN), as well as cyber terrorism.

The deliberate use of (WMD–CBRN) by hostile states or terrorists and of naturally emerging infectious diseases that have a potential to cause illness on a massive scale could pose a national security threat.1 Resulting panic and economic damage could paralyze a country.

Keywords

Hemorrhagic Fever Rift Valley Fever Biological Weapon Francisella Tularensis Lassa Fever 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Meir Oren
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.The Hillel-Yaffe Medical CenterHaderaIsrael
  2. 2.The National Advisory Committee of Hospital Preparedness for Biological Exceptional Scenario, (BW, Bioterrorism, Natural Outbreaks)The Ministry of HealthHaderaIsrael

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