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Environment

  • Alan Griffith
  • Paul Watson
Chapter
  • 74 Downloads

Abstract

The construction industry is coming under increasing pressure to make its activities more environmentally acceptable … good practice on site to preserve our environment is now usually a high priority for clients, their professional advisors, contractors and regulators” (CIRIA, 1999a). Likewise, principal contractors are coming under increasing pressure to conduct their siteworks with greater responsibility towards the environment and towards persons on and around the site. All contractors’ projects have unequivocal effects on the environment whenever and wherever they are undertaken. The demand for greater environmentally considerate and sustainable construction and increasingly stringent regulation also suggests that environmental management will become an important formal feature within the construction processes in the future, in the same way that quality management has evolved over the last thirty years. Effective environmental management, a product of good site management practice, can create improved environmental conditions on a project. It enables the principal contractor to fulfil its environmental responsibilities both on and around the site and ensure that environmental legislation is met. Effective environmental management focuses on ensuring that the siteworks are planned, organised and carried out with full awareness and understanding of the environmental effects that the works create; moreover, ensuring that the works are assessed for environmental risk and that, where necessary, mitigation measures are established. In this way, environmental safeguard becomes an intrinsic part of managing the project.

Keywords

Environmental Impact Assessment Environmental Impact Assessment Environmental Management System Construction Management Construction Waste 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Alan Griffith and Paul Watson 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan Griffith
  • Paul Watson

There are no affiliations available

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