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LARS2 Variants Associated with Hydrops, Lactic Acidosis, Sideroblastic Anemia, and Multisystem Failure

  • Lisa G. Riley
  • Joëlle Rudinger-Thirion
  • Klaus Schmitz-Abe
  • David R. Thorburn
  • Ryan L. Davis
  • Juliana Teo
  • Susan Arbuckle
  • Sandra T. Cooper
  • Dean R. Campagna
  • Magali Frugier
  • Kyriacos Markianos
  • Carolyn M. Sue
  • Mark D. Fleming
  • John Christodoulou
Research Report
Part of the JIMD Reports book series (JIMD, volume 28)

Abstract

Pathogenic variants in mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases result in a broad range of mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders despite their shared role in mitochondrial protein synthesis. LARS2 encodes the mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase, which attaches leucine to its cognate tRNA. Sequence variants in LARS2 have previously been associated with Perrault syndrome, characterized by premature ovarian failure and hearing loss (OMIM #615300). In this study, we report variants in LARS2 that are associated with a severe multisystem metabolic disorder. The proband was born prematurely with severe lactic acidosis, hydrops, and sideroblastic anemia. She had multisystem complications with hyaline membrane disease, impaired cardiac function, a coagulopathy, pulmonary hypertension, and progressive renal disease and succumbed at 5 days of age. Whole exome sequencing of patient DNA revealed compound heterozygous variants in LARS2 (c.1289C>T; p.Ala430Val and c.1565C>A; p.Thr522Asn). The c.1565C>A (p.Thr522Asn) LARS2 variant has previously been associated with Perrault syndrome and both identified variants are predicted to be damaging (SIFT, PolyPhen). Muscle and liver samples from the proband did not display marked mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme deficiency. Immunoblotting of patient muscle and liver showed LARS2 levels were reduced in liver and complex I protein levels were reduced in patient muscle and liver. Aminoacylation assays revealed p.Ala430Val LARS2 had an 18-fold loss of catalytic efficiency and p.Thr522Asn a 9-fold loss compared to wild-type LARS2. We suggest that the identified LARS2 variants are responsible for the severe multisystem clinical phenotype seen in this baby and that mutations in LARS2 can result in variable phenotypes.

Keywords

Premature Ovarian Failure Respiratory Chain Complex Mitochondrial Protein Synthesis Sideroblastic Anemia LARS2 Variant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are indebted to Enduo Wang (Shanghai) and Susan Martinis (Urbana) for their generous gifts of clones encoding LARS2 and editing deprived E. coli LARS, respectively. This research was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) Project Grant APP1026891. RLD is an NHMRC Early Career Fellow, DRT is an NHMRC Principal Research Fellow, STC is an NHMRC Career Development Fellow, and CMS is an NHMRC Practitioner Fellow. MDF and KM are supported by RO1 DK 087992 from the US National Institutes of Health. We are grateful to the Crane and Perkins families for their generous financial support.

Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© SSIEM and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lisa G. Riley
    • 1
    • 2
  • Joëlle Rudinger-Thirion
    • 3
  • Klaus Schmitz-Abe
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
  • David R. Thorburn
    • 7
  • Ryan L. Davis
    • 8
  • Juliana Teo
    • 9
  • Susan Arbuckle
    • 10
  • Sandra T. Cooper
    • 2
    • 11
  • Dean R. Campagna
    • 12
  • Magali Frugier
    • 3
  • Kyriacos Markianos
    • 4
    • 5
  • Carolyn M. Sue
    • 8
  • Mark D. Fleming
    • 12
  • John Christodoulou
    • 1
    • 2
    • 13
  1. 1.Genetic Metabolic Disorders Research UnitKids Research Institute, Children’s Hospital at WestmeadWestmeadAustralia
  2. 2.Discipline of Paediatrics & Child HealthSydney Medical School, University of SydneySydneyAustralia
  3. 3.Architecture et Réactivité de l’ARN, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, IBMCStrasbourgFrance
  4. 4.Division of Genetics and Genomics, Department of MedicineBoston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  5. 5.Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research, Boston Children’s HospitalBostonUSA
  6. 6.Broad InstituteCambridgeUSA
  7. 7.Department of PaediatricsMurdoch Children’s Research Institute and Victorian Clinical Genetics Services, Royal Children’s Hospital, University of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  8. 8.Department of NeurogeneticsKolling Institute of Medical Research, University of Sydney and Royal North Shore HospitalSydneyAustralia
  9. 9.Department of HaematologyChildren’s Hospital at WestmeadSydneyAustralia
  10. 10.Department of PathologyChildren’s Hospital at WestmeadSydneyAustralia
  11. 11.Institute for Neuroscience and Muscle Research, Kids Research Institute, Children’s Hospital at WestmeadSydneyAustralia
  12. 12.Department of PathologyBoston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  13. 13.Discipline of Genetic Medicine, Sydney Medical School, University of SydneySydneyAustralia

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