New Perspectives in Regeneration pp 163-191

Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 367)

Neural Regeneration

  • Melissa M. Steward
  • Akshayalakshmi Sridhar
  • Jason S. Meyer
Chapter

Abstract

Regeneration of the nervous system requires either the repair or replacement of nerve cells that have been damaged by injury or disease. While lower organisms possess extensive capacity for neural regeneration, evolutionarily higher organisms including humans are limited in their ability to regenerate nerve cells, posing significant issues for the treatment of injury and disease of the nervous system. This chapter focuses on current approaches for neural regeneration, with a discussion of traditional methods to enhance neural regeneration as well as emerging concepts within the field such as stem cells and cellular reprogramming. Stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew as well as their ability to differentiate into multiple cell types, and hence can serve as a source for cell replacement of damaged neurons. Traditionally, adult stem cells isolated from the hippocampus and subventricular zone have served as a source of neural stem cells for replacement purposes. With the advancement of pluripotent stem cells, including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), new and exciting approaches for neural cell replacement are being developed. Furthermore, with increased understanding of the human genome and epigenetics, scientists have been successful in the direct genetic reprogramming of somatic cells to a neuronal fate, bypassing the intermediary pluripotent stage. Such breakthroughs have accelerated the timing of production of mature neuronal cell types from a patient-specific somatic cell source such as skin fibroblasts or mononuclear blood cells. While extensive hurdles remain to the translational application of such stem cell and reprogramming strategies, these approaches have revolutionized the field of regenerative biology and have provided innovative approaches for the potential regeneration of the nervous system.

Abbreviations

6-OHDA

6-Hydroxydopamine

ALS

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

AMD

Age-related macular degeneration

BAM

Brn-2, Ascl1 and Myt1l

BDNF

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor

bHLH

Basic helix loop helix

CNTF

Ciliary neurotrophic factor

DA

Dopaminergic

EGF

Epidermal growth factor

ESCs

Embryonic stem cells

FAD

Familial Alzheimer’s disease

FALS

Familial ALS

FGF2

Fibroblast growth factor 2

FGF8

Fibroblast growth factor 8

GDNF

Glial-derived neurotrophic factor

hESCs

Human embryonic stem cells

hPSCs

Human pluripotent stem cells

iDA

Induced dopaminergic

IGF-1

Insulin-like growth factor

iMN

Induced motor neuron

iN

Induced neuronal

iNPCs

Induced neural progenitor cells

iPSCs

Induced pluripotent stem cells

L-DOPA

L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine

MEF

Mouse embryonic fibroblasts

miRNA

Microribonucleic acid

mRNA

Messenger ribonucleic acid

NCAMs

Neural cell adhesion molecules

NPCs

Neural progenitor cells

PB

Piggyback

PD

Parkinson’s disease

RCS

Royal College of Surgeon’s

RPE

Retinal pigmented epithelium

SCNT

Somatic cell nuclear transfer

SHH

Sonic hedgehog

SMA

Spinal muscular atrophy

SMN1/SMN2

Survival of motor neuron gene 1/2

SOD1

Superoxide dismutase

TGF

Transforming growth factor

TH

Tyrosine hydroxylase

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Melissa M. Steward
    • 1
  • Akshayalakshmi Sridhar
    • 1
  • Jason S. Meyer
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of BiologyIndiana University Purdue UniversityIndianapolisUSA
  2. 2.Indiana University Center for Regenerative Biology and MedicineIndianapolisUSA
  3. 3.Department of Medical and Molecular GeneticsIndiana UniversityIndianapolisUSA
  4. 4.Stark Neurosciences Research InstituteIndiana UniversityIndianapolisUSA

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