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pp 1-44 | Cite as

Zooplankton of the White Sea: Communities’ Structure, Seasonal Dynamics, Spatial Distribution, and Ecology

  • Ksenia N. Kosobokova
  • Natalia M. Pertsova
Chapter
Part of the The Handbook of Environmental Chemistry book series

Abstract

A comprehensive review of the state-of-the art knowledge on structure, ecology, and distribution of zooplankton communities of the White Sea is provided. Based on the detailed species inventory and understanding of the zoogeographical origin of the planktonic fauna of the White Sea, a comparison of zooplankton communities of different regions and bays of the White Sea is presented for the first time. Standard sampling techniques allowed assessment and comparison of zooplankton abundance and biomass for different sea regions. Patterns of the horizontal distribution of zooplankton, as well as seasonal and long-term variation of the zooplankton structure and biomass, are discussed. Life cycle strategies and ecology of key zooplankton species along with major features of phenology are described. Data presented here may serve as baseline information for monitoring the structure and productivity of the White Sea zooplankton communities in the future and under ongoing climate change.

Keywords

Arctic sea Calanus Community Copepods Interannual variability Life cycle Seasonal migrations Spatial distribution Species composition Zooplankton 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was performed in the framework of the state assignment of FASO Russia (theme no. 0149-2018-0035). The study was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, project nos. 02-05-65059, 03-05-64871, and 16-04-00375; the field data was partially collected with the support of the international project INTAS 96-1359, INTAS 98-1881, and ICA2 -CT-2000-10053 of the Commission of the European Communities. The authors are grateful to the staff of the N.A. Pertsov White Sea Biological Station of Moscow State University for the logistic support of the half-a-century monitoring program and assistance during collection of zooplankton at permanent stations in the Kandalaksha Bay and in shipboard expeditions.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Shirshov Institute of Oceanology Russian Academy of Sciences (IO RAS)MoscowRussia
  2. 2.Moscow State University (MSU)MoscowRussia

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