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Infections Caused by Influenza Viruses Among Children in Poland During the 2017/18 Epidemic Season

  • K. ŁuniewskaEmail author
  • K. Szymański
  • E. Hallmann-Szelińska
  • D. Kowalczyk
  • R. Sałamatin
  • A. Masny
  • L. B. Brydak
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 1211)

Abstract

Influenza is an infectious disease that is a threat to both children and adults. The most effective way to prevent infections among children is seasonal vaccination in every epidemic season, which is recommended from the age of 6 months onward. This study is a report of the prevalence of influenza infection in the population of children up to the age of 14 years and of the type of influenza virus involved during the 2017/18 epidemic season in Poland. We found that influenza A and B viruses co-dominated in the season. Among the influenza A viruses, A/H1N1/ pdm09 subtype was a more frequent source of infection than A/H3N2/ subtype. In addition, the prevalence of infection was re-analyzed in children stratified into the age groups of 0–4, 5–9, and 10–14 years old. We found a relation between the age of a child and the type of influenza virus causing infection. The youngest children under 4 years were the most vulnerable to both influenza and influenza-like infections; the former caused mostly by influenza A and the latter by RSV. In contradistinction, influenza B dominated in the oldest children aged 10–14 and RSV infections were not present in this age group. The characteristics of influenza viruses may however vary on the seasonal basis.

Keywords

Children Infection Influenza Molecular biology Respiratory tract Virology 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Supported by NIPH-NIH grant 3/EM. The authors thank the physicians and employees of VSESs in the SENTINEL program for their help in the influenza surveillance in Poland.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflict of interests in relation to this article.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards. The study was approved by an institutional Ethics Committee.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study before collection of nasopharyngeal samples.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Łuniewska
    • 1
    Email author
  • K. Szymański
    • 1
  • E. Hallmann-Szelińska
    • 1
  • D. Kowalczyk
    • 1
  • R. Sałamatin
    • 2
  • A. Masny
    • 1
  • L. B. Brydak
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Influenza Research, National Influenza CenterNational Institute of Public Health- National Institute of HygieneWarsawPoland
  2. 2.Department of General Biology and ParasitologyWarsaw Medical UniversityWarsawPoland

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