Antibacterial Bioactive Glass, S53P4, for Chronic Bone Infections – A Multinational Study

  • Nina Lindfors
  • Jan Geurts
  • Lorenzo Drago
  • J. J. Arts
  • Vesa Juutilainen
  • Pekka Hyvönen
  • Arnold J. Suda
  • Aloj Domenico
  • Stefano Artiaco
  • Chingiz Alizadeh
  • Adrian Brychcy
  • Jertzy Bialecki
  • Carlo L. Romanò
Chapter

Abstract

Osteomyelitis is an infectious process in bone that occasionally leads to bone destruction. Traditionally, the surgical treatment procedure is performed in combination with systemic and local antibiotics as a two-stage procedure that uses autograft or allograft bone for filling of the cavitary defect. Bioactive glass (BAG-S53P4) is a bone substitute with proven antibacterial and bone bonding properties.

One hundred and sixteen patients who had verified chronic osteomyelitis was treated using BAG-S53P4 as part of the treatment. Most of the patients had previously undergone numerous procedures, sometimes for decades. A register of patient data obtained from 11 centers from Finland, Italy, the Netherlands, Germany, Azerbaijan and Poland was set-up and continuously maintained at Helsinki University Central Hospital.

The location of the osteomyelitis was mainly in the tibia followed by the femur and then the calcaneus. The median age of the patients was 48 years (15–87). The patients were either treated according to a one-stage procedure without local antibiotics (85 %) or by a two-stage procedure using antibiotic beads in the first procedure (15 %). The minimum follow-up was 1 year (12–95 months, median 31).

The cure rate was 104/116, the total success rate 90 % and most of the patients showed a rapid recovery.

The study shows that (BAG-S53P4) can be used in a one-stage procedure in treatment of osteomyelitis with excellent results.

Keywords

Bioactive glass S53P4 Osteomyelitis Antibacterial Bone substitute 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nina Lindfors
    • 1
  • Jan Geurts
    • 2
  • Lorenzo Drago
    • 3
  • J. J. Arts
    • 2
    • 4
  • Vesa Juutilainen
    • 1
  • Pekka Hyvönen
    • 5
  • Arnold J. Suda
    • 6
  • Aloj Domenico
    • 7
  • Stefano Artiaco
    • 7
  • Chingiz Alizadeh
    • 8
  • Adrian Brychcy
    • 9
  • Jertzy Bialecki
    • 9
  • Carlo L. Romanò
    • 10
  1. 1.Department of Orthopaedic and Plastic SurgeryHelsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki UniversityHelsinkiFinland
  2. 2.Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryResearch School CAPHRI, Maastricht University Medical CentreMaastrichtThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Laboratory of Clinical Chemistry and MicrobiologyI.R.C.C.S. Galeazzi Orthopaedic InstituteMilanItaly
  4. 4.Orthopaedic Biomechanics GroupDepartment of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e)EindhovenThe Netherlands
  5. 5.Department of Orthopaedic and TraumatologyOulu University HospitalOuluFinland
  6. 6.Department for Septic SurgeryBG Trauma Center LudwigshafenLudwigshafenGermany
  7. 7.I Orthopaedic ClinicUniversity of Turin, Orthopaedic and Trauma Center - CTO HospitalTurinItaly
  8. 8.Azerbaijan Scientific Research Institute of Traumatology and OrthopaedicsBakuAzerbaijan
  9. 9.Department of Bone and Joint InfectionsOrthopedic Clinic of Postgraduate Medical Education CentreOtwockPoland
  10. 10.Center for Reconstructive Surgery of Osteoarticular Infections (CRIO)I.R.C.C.S. Galeazzi Orthopaedic InstituteMilanItaly

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