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Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Advanced Lung Cancer Patients During Chemotherapy

  • D. JastrzębskiEmail author
  • M. Maksymiak
  • S. Kostorz
  • B. Bezubka
  • I. Osmanska
  • T. Młynczak
  • A. Rutkowska
  • Z. Baczek
  • D. Ziora
  • J. Kozielski
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 861)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of pulmonary rehabilitation for improving of exercises efficiency, dyspnea, and quality of life of patients with lung cancer during chemotherapy. After the enrollment selection, the study included 20 patients with newly diagnosed advanced lung cancer and performance status 0–2. There were 12 patients randomly allocated to the pulmonary rehabilitation group and another 8 constituted the control group that did not undergo physical rehabilitation. Both groups of patients had continual cycles of chemotherapy. Data were analyzed before and after 8 weeks of physical rehabilitation, and before and after 8 weeks of observation without rehabilitation in controls. The inpatient rehabilitation program was based on exercise training with ski poles and respiratory muscle training. We found a tendency for enhanced mobility (6 Minute Walk Test: 527.3 ± 107.4 vs. 563.9 ±64.6 m; p > 0.05) and a significant increase in forced expired volume in 1 s (66.9 ± 13.2 vs. 78.4 ± 17.7 %predicted; p = 0.016), less dyspnea (p = 0.05), and a tendency for improvement in the general quality of life questionnaire after completion of pulmonary rehabilitation as compared with the control group. This report suggests that pulmonary rehabilitation in advanced lung cancer patients during chemotherapy is a beneficial intervention to reduce dyspnea and enhance the quality of life and mobility.

Keywords

Dyspnea Exercises efficiency Lung cancer Lung function Nordic walking Pulmonary rehabilitation Quality of life 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by grant KNW-1-111/P/2/0 from the Medical University of Silesia, Poland.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest in relation to this article.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Jastrzębski
    • 1
    Email author
  • M. Maksymiak
    • 2
  • S. Kostorz
    • 1
  • B. Bezubka
    • 1
  • I. Osmanska
    • 1
  • T. Młynczak
    • 1
  • A. Rutkowska
    • 3
  • Z. Baczek
    • 4
  • D. Ziora
    • 1
  • J. Kozielski
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Lung Diseases and TuberculosisMedical University of SilesiaZabrzePoland
  2. 2.Department of Rehabilitation, School of Health SciencesMedical University of SilesiaKatowicePoland
  3. 3.Institute of PhysiotherapyOpole University of Technology and PhysiotherapyOpolePoland
  4. 4.Upper Silesian Rehabilitation CenterUstrońPoland

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