Advertisement

A Turning Strategy of a Multi-legged Locomotion Robot

  • Kazuo Tsuchiya
  • Shinya Aoi
  • Katsuyoshi Tsujita

Abstract

In this paper, we analyze the walking stability of a multi-legged locomotion robot. Based on dynamic characteristics, we propose a strategy for turning whose effectiveness is verified by numerical simulations. The robot can turn more efficiently with fewer slips after decreasing walking stability. That is, the maneuverability of the robot increases by changing the dynamic properties of the robot.

Keywords

Hopf Bifurcation Destination Point Stick Insect Follower Force Hexapod Robot 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Bolotin, V. V. (1963) Nonconservative Problems of the Theory of Elastic Stability. Pergamon Press, New York.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Dean, J., Kindermann, T., Schmitz, J., Schumm, M., and Cruse, H. (1999) Control of walking in the stick insect: from behavior and physiology to modeling. Autonomous Robots 7(3):271–288.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Jindrich, D. and Full, R. J. (1999) Many-legged maneuverability: dynamics of turning in hexapods. J. Exp. Biol. 202:1603–1623.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Kubow, T. M. and Full, R. J. (1999) The role of the mechanical system in control: a hypothesis of self-stabilization in hexapedal runners. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B 354:849–861.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Quinn, R. D., Nelson, G. M., Bachmann, R. J., Kingsley, D. A., Offi, J., and Ritzmann, R. E. (2001) Insect designs for improved robot mobility. Proc. of 4th Int. Conf. on Climbing and Walking Robots (CLAWAR 2001), pp. 69–76.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Schmitt, J. and Holmes, P. (2000) Mechanical models for insect locomotion: dynamics and stability in the horizontal plane I. Theory. Biol. Cybern. 83:501–515.zbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Schmitt, J. and Holmes, P. (2000) Mechanical models for insect locomotion: dynamics and stability in the horizontal plane II. Application. Biol. Cybern. 83:517–527.zbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Schmitz, J., Dean, J., Kindermann, T., Schumm, M., and Cruse, H. (2001) A biologically inspired controller for hexapod walking: simple solutions by exploiting physical properties. Biol. Bull. 200:195–200.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Watson, J. T., Ritzmann, R. E., Zill, S. N., and Pollack, A. J. (2002) Control of obstacle climbing in the cockroach, Blaberus discoidalis. I. Kinematics. J. Comp. Physiol. A 188:39–53.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Watson, J. T., Ritzmann, R. E., and Pollack, A. J. (2002) Control of climbing behavior in the cockroach, Blaberus discoidalis. II. Motor activities associated with joint movement. J. Comp. Physiol. A 188:55–69.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kazuo Tsuchiya
    • 1
  • Shinya Aoi
    • 1
  • Katsuyoshi Tsujita
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Graduate School of EngineeringKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan

Personalised recommendations