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Evaluation of KQML as an agent communication language

  • James Mayfield
  • Yannis Labrou
  • Tim Finin
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1037)

Abstract

This chapter discusses the desirable features of languages and protocols for communication among intelligent information agents. These desiderata are divided into seven categories: form, content, semantics, implementation, networking, environment, and reliability. The Knowledge Query and Manipulation Language (KQML) is a new language and protocol for exchanging information and knowledge. This work is part of a larger effort, the ARPA Knowledge Sharing Effort, which is aimed at developing techniques and methodologies for building large-scale knowledge bases that are sharable and reusable. KQML is both a message format and a message-handling protocol to support run-time knowledge sharing among agents. KQML is described and evaluated as an agent communication language relative to the desiderata.

Keywords

Multiagent System Software Agent Communication Language Content Language Agent Communication Language 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Mayfield
    • 1
  • Yannis Labrou
    • 1
  • Tim Finin
    • 1
  1. 1.Computer Science and Electrical Engineering DepartmentUniversity of Maryland Baltimore CountyBaltimoreUSA

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