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The Eureka Software Factory: Concepts and accomplishments

  • Christer Fernström
Invited Papers
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 550)

Abstract

The Eureka Software Factory project has been active since late 1986. This paper describes the overall aims and technical approach of the project and provides a status report as of mid 1991.

The need to adapt the computerized part of a software factory to the total needs of the factory is important, while at the same time the needs change over the life-time of the factory. Flexible adaptation is therefore important and is in ESF achieved through process modelling and process enactment, which is applied within the framework of a factory evolution model.

The factory evolution model of ESF is supported by a set of functionalities given the name ESF Support. The first full implementation of ESF Support, which will be available mid 1992, is described, together with the experimental prototypes which are currently under evaluation.

Keywords

User Interaction Support Environment Service Component Work Context Process Enactment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christer Fernström
    • 1
  1. 1.Cap Gemini InnovationGrenoble Research CentreMeylanFrance

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