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The urban mosaic of post-socialist Europe

  • Zorica Nedović-Budić
  • Sasha Tsenkova
  • Peter Marcuse
Part of the Contributions to Economics book series (CE)

Keywords

Urban Planning Urban Space Urban Form Urban Policy Urban Governance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Physica-Verlag Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zorica Nedović-Budić
    • 1
  • Sasha Tsenkova
    • 2
  • Peter Marcuse
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Urban and Regional PlanningUniversity of IllinoisUrbana-Champaign
  2. 2.International DevelopmentUniversity of CalgaryCanada
  3. 3.Urban PlanningColumbia UniversityNew York City

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