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Spatial Reasoning with Topological Information

  • Jochen Renz
  • Bernhard Nebel
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1404)

Abstract

This chapter summarizes our ongoing research on topological spatial reasoning using the Region Connection Calculus. We are addressing different questions and problems that arise when using this calculus. This includes representational issues, e.g., how can regions be represented and what is the required dimension of the applied space. Further, it includes computational issues, e.g., how hard is it to reason with the calculus and are there efficient algorithms. Finally, we also address cognitive issues, i.e., is the calculus cognitively adequate.

Keywords

Modal Logic Base Relation Accessibility Relation Canonical Model Kripke Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jochen Renz
    • 1
  • Bernhard Nebel
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für InformatikAlbert-Ludwigs-UniversitätFreiburgGermany

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