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Vague regions

  • Martin Erwig
  • Markus Schneider
Spatial Data Models
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1262)

Abstract

In many geographical applications there is a need to model spatial phenomena not simply by sharp objects but rather through indeterminate or vague concepts. To support such applications we present a model of vague regions which covers and extends previous approaches. The formal framework is based on a general exact model of spatial data types. On the one hand, this simplifies the definition of the vague model since we can build upon already existing theory of spatial data types. On the other hand, this approach facilitates the migration from exact to vague models. Moreover, exact spatial data types are subsumed as a special case of the presented vague concepts. We present examples and show how they are represented within our framework. We give a formal definition of basic operations and predicates which particularly allow a more fine-grained investigation of spatial situations than in the pure exact case. We also demonstrate the integration of the presented concepts into an SQL-like query language.

Keywords

Geographical Information System Geographical Information System Spatial Object Boundary Part Numeric Operation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Erwig
    • 1
  • Markus Schneider
    • 1
  1. 1.Praktische Informatik IVFern Universität HagenHagenGermany

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