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Diagrammatic knowledge acquisition: Elicitation, analysis and issues

  • Peter C. -H. Cheng
Eliciting Knowledge from Textual and Other Sources
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1076)

Abstract

This paper considers the acquisition of knowledge that experts would naturally express in the form of diagrams — diagrammatic knowledge acquisition, DKA. The implications for DKA of previous research on diagrammatic representations and reasoning are considered. Examples of knowledge elicitation and knowledge analysis, with two different diagrammatic representations, are given. They demonstrate the feasibility of DKA. Issues raised by the analysis of the examples are discussed and consideration is given to the development of DKA tools and methodologies. DKA is distinguished from knowledge visualization, which attempts to design effective visual presentations of given information that is already expressed as propositions.

Keywords

Diagrammatic Representation Cognitive Science Society Propositional Representation Knowledge Elicitation Diagrammatic Reasoning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter C. -H. Cheng
    • 1
  1. 1.ESRC Centre for Research in Development, Instruction and Training, Department of PsychologyUniversity of Nottingham

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