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NLG applications to technical documentation A view through IDAS

  • Chris Mellish
  • Ehud Reiter
  • John Levine
Miscellaneous
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1036)

Abstract

This paper makes an initial assessment of the prospects of commercial applications of Natural Language Generation (NLG) in the area of technical documentation. This is very much our own personal view, though based on experiences in the IDAS natural language generation project and discussions with our project partners and other interested parties. We start to address the following kinds of questions:
  1. 1.

    What has NLG to offer?

     
  2. 2.

    Why are there so few real applications at present?

     
  3. 3.

    What extra constraints do real applications impose?

     
  4. 4.

    How can we compensate for current limitations in NLG?

     
  5. 5.

    Where is new NLG work needed?

     

In particular, we hope to give our own view of what areas NLG researchers should focus on if they want their work to be relevant to industrial applications in technical documentation.

Keywords

Knowledge Base Domain Modelling Machine Translation Technical Documentation Automatic Test Equip 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chris Mellish
    • 1
  • Ehud Reiter
    • 1
  • John Levine
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Artificial IntelligenceUniversity of EdinburghUK

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