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Polynomial-time algorithm for computing translocation distance between genomes

  • Sridhar Hannenhalli
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 937)

Abstract

With the advent of large-scale DNA physical mapping and sequencing, studies of genome rearrangements are becoming increasingly important in evolutionary molecular biology. From a computational perspective, study of evolution based on rearrangements leads to rearrangement distance problem, i.e., computing the minimum number of rearrangement events required to transform one genome into another. Different types of rearrangement events give rise to a spectrum of interesting combinatorial problems. The complexity of most of these problems is unknown. Multichromosomal genomes frequently evolve by a rearrangement event called translocation which exchanges genetic material between different chromosomes. In this paper we study the translocation distance problem, modeling evolution of genomes evolving by translocations. Translocation distance problem was recently studied for the first time by Kececioglu and Ravi, who gave a 2-approximation algorithm for computing translocation distance. In this paper we prove a duality theorem leading to a polynomial algorithm for computing translocation distance for the case when the orientation of the genes are known. This leads to an algorithm generating a most parsimonious (shortest) scenario, transforming one genome into another by translocations.

Keywords

Genome Rearrangement Duality Theorem Target Genome Rearrangement Event Distance Problem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sridhar Hannenhalli
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer Science and EngineeringThe Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity Park

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