Advertisement

Computer productivity initiative: Past, present, and future

  • Kurt J. Maly
  • Dennis E. Ray
  • J. Christian Wild
  • Irwin B. Levinstein
  • Stephan Olariu
  • C. Michael Overstreet
  • Nageswara S. V. Rao
  • Deane Sibol
  • George Panayides
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 895)

Abstract

The Computer Productivity Initiative (CPI) is a jointly funded effort by Old Dominion University and the National Science Foundation to address some shortcomings of the traditional CS curriculum. In CPI students apply CS knowledge in the context of a broad range of issues affecting the productive employment of CS technology. The CPI program is also directed towards the development of career skills including group interaction, technical communications, and interviewing as well as domain analysis. This paper discusses the lessons learned from the two year effort to implement this new program. These include: using an external board of industry executives for the final review of senior-level course projects is highly motivating and effective; students take longer than expected to gain competence but then become more competent than expected; a relatively small class size is necessary to implement a “learn by doing” approach; building a prototype to demonstrate concept and assess risks is very effective but can be time consuming; evaluation of a proposed implementation is difficult in the absence of a “real” customer; a better method of reality checks is needed; tight schedules are difficult to fit into traditional semester boundaries; students are enthusiastic about the program and gain confidence in their ability to enter their careers; the level of effort is comparable to that in project oriented courses for both students and instructors; CPI graduates report increased responsibilities and pay as compared to their counterparts.

Overall, we have found that the CPI program is an effective means of involving outside employers with the department, and provides our students a competitive edge in the market place. Starting Fall 1994, CPI will become part of our CS core.

Keywords

Project Topic Project Management Software Previous Semester Computer Support Collaborative Work British Computer Society 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    A report on undergraduate curricula for software engineeing. British Computer Society and Institution of Electrical Engineers, 1989.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Curriculum Task Force, 1991. Computing Curricula 1991.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    The Case for Change. Commonwealth of Virginia, Commision on The University of The 21st Century, Richmond, Virginia, 1992.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    J. Foley et al. Report of the NSF Computer Science Education Workshop. SIGCSE Bulletin, 20(3), 1988.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    P. Denning et al. Computing as a discipline. Communications of the ACM, 1, 1989.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Thomas L. Grrenbaum. The Handbook for Focus Group Research. Lexington Books, 1993.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. IEEE Standards Collection, 1993.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    K. Maly, C. M. Overstreet, H. A. Wahab, and A. K. Gupta. Melding television, networking, and computing for interactive remote instruction: Exploiting potentials. accepted for presentation, June 1994. World Conference on Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia'94, Vancouver Canada.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    K. Maly, D. Ray, I. Levinstein, S. Olariu, C. M. Overstreet, N. Rao, T. Ireland, and G. Kantsios. Computer productivity initiative. Seventh SEI Conference on Software Engineering Education, San Antonio, Texas:441–459, January 1994.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    K. Maly, C. Wild, C. Zhang, D. Ray, I. Levinstein, S. Olariu, C. M. Overstreet, N. Rao, D. Rosca, T. Taylor, T. Ireland, and D. Sibol. A decision-based hypermultimedia case environment for the computer productivity initiative, a large undergraduate project. accepted for publication, June 1994. World Conference on Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, Vancouver Canada.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    D. L. Parnas. Education for computing professionals. IEEE Computer, 23(1):17–22, 1990.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    M. Shaw. We can improve the way we teach CS students. Computing Research News, 4(1):2–3, 1992. letter to the editor.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Jane F. Templeton. Focus Groups: A Guide for Marketing and Advertising Professionals. Probus Publishing, 1987.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    W. A. Wulf. SE programs won't solve our problems. Computing Research News, 3(5):2, 1991. letter to the editor.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kurt J. Maly
    • 1
  • Dennis E. Ray
    • 1
  • J. Christian Wild
    • 1
  • Irwin B. Levinstein
    • 1
  • Stephan Olariu
    • 1
  • C. Michael Overstreet
    • 1
  • Nageswara S. V. Rao
    • 2
  • Deane Sibol
    • 1
  • George Panayides
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceOld Dominion UniversityNorfolk
  2. 2.Intelligent Systems Section, Center for Engineering Systems Advanced ResearchOak Ridge National LaboratoryOak Ridge

Personalised recommendations