Grid layouts of block diagrams — bounding the number of bends in each connection (extended abstract)

  • S. Even
  • G. Granot
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 894)

Abstract

Consider an input data which specifies rectangular modules and connections between them; this is a graph. The size of the modules and the placements of the terminals on them is given as part of the input. We produce a block diagram, conforming to the input. The block diagram is on the rectilinear grid, and each edge (connection between modules) has few bends.

For planar input, a linear-time algorithm is described to construct a planar drawing with at most 6 bends in each self-loop and at most 4 bends in any other edge. The external face of the drawing may be specified by the user. We show a planar input with no self-loops which has no drawing with at most 3 bends in every edge and another planar input which has no drawing with at most 5 bends in every self-loop.

A linear-time algorithm is described to construct a nonplanar drawing of any input, with at most 4 bends in each edge. We show inputs that have no drawing with at most 3 bends in every edge.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Even
    • 1
  • G. Granot
    • 1
  1. 1.Computer Science Department TechnionIsrael Inst. of Tech.HaifaIsrael

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