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Components of problem solving and types of problems

  • Joost Breuker
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 867)

Abstract

A typology of problems is presented that is used for indexing and accessing reusable problem solving components in a library that supports the CommonKADS methodology for building knowledge based systems. Eight types of problems, such as planning, assessment etc., are distinguished, and their dependencies are explained. These dependencies suggest that the typology is to be viewed as a “suite” rather than the usual taxonomy of “generic tasks”. Developing the suite has lead to some new insights and elaborations of [Newell and Simon, 1972]'s theory for modeling problem solving.

  • Tasks are distinguished from problem definitions. A tasks is constructed by finding and configuring problem solving methods (PSMs), which are suitable for solving the (well-) defined problem. Tasks and PSMs therefore have a one to one correspondence ([O'Hara and Shadbolt, 1993]), while there is a one to many corresponce between a problem definition (type) and PSMs.

  • Three phases are proposed that turn spontaneous, ill-defined problems into well-defined ones, respectively. into problem solving tasks.

  • A complete solution consists of three components: a case model, an argument structure and a conclusion. The conclusion is a sub-part of both other components.

  • Tasks (PSMs) package recurring chains of dependent types of problems in variable ways.

  • The availability of behavioural models, or of structural/behavioural models in a domain determines to a large extent which types of problems can be posed and solved.

Keywords

Assignment Problem Knowledge Acquisition Problem Type Problem Definition Case Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joost Breuker
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Social Science InformaticsUniversity of AmsterdamWB AmsterdamThe Netherlands

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