Advertisement

Geographic data handling in a deductive object-oriented database

  • Alia I. Abdelmoty
  • Norman W. Paton
  • M. Howard Williams
  • Alvaro A. A. Fernandes
  • Maria L. Barja
  • Andrew Dinn
Geographical Databases
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 856)

Abstract

This paper describes how a deductive object-oriented database (DOOD) can be used to support the storage and management of data which is typical of that found in geographic information systems (GIS). This is done with two aims in mind: to illustrate how a combination of deductive and object-oriented facilities can be applied effectively in an advanced application, thereby motivating the development of DOOD systems; and to show how geographic database systems stand to gain from the utilisation of advanced data modelling and inference facilities as supported by a DOOD. The paper describes the DOOD system which has been used for prototyping a range of geographic concepts, presents a framework for the structural organisation of GIS data using an object-oriented data model, and shows how a logic query language can be used within this structural framework to perform a range of analyses.

Keywords

Geographic Information System Geographic Information System Horn Clause Deductive Database Geographic Application 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [AS91]
    W.G. Aref and H. Samet. Extending a DBMS with Spatial Operations. In O. Gunther and H.J. Scheck, editors, Advances in Spatial Databases, SSD'91, LNCS 525, pages 299–318, 1991. Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  2. [AWP93]
    Alia I. Abdelmoty, M.Howard Williams, and Norman W. Paton. Deduction and Deductive Databases for Geographic Data Handling. In Design and Implementation of Large Spatial Databases, Third International Symposium, SSD '93, LNCS 692, pages 443–464. Springer Verlag, June 1993.Google Scholar
  3. [BPF+94]
    M.L. Barja, N.W. Paton, A.A.A. Fernandes, M.H. Williams, and A. Dinn. An Effective Deductive Object-Oriented Database Through Language Integration. In Proc. 20th VLDB, 1994.Google Scholar
  4. [CGT90]
    S. Ceri, G. Gottlob, and L. Tanca. Logic Programming and Databases. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1990.Google Scholar
  5. [Ege91]
    M.J. Egenhofer. Reasoning About Binary Topological Relations. In O. Gunther and H.J. Scheck, editors, Advances in Spatial Databases, 2nd Symposium, SSD'91, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 525, pages 143–161, Zurich, Switzerland., 1991. Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  6. [Ege92]
    M.J. Egenhofer. Why not SQL! Int. J. Geographic Information Systems, 6(2):71–85, 1992.Google Scholar
  7. [Gut88]
    R.H. Guting. Geo-Relational Algebra: A Model and Query Language for Geometric Database Systems. In J.W. Schmidt and M. Missikoff, editors, Advances in Database Technology-EDBT'88, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, pages 506–527, Venice, Italy, 1988. Spriger Verlag.Google Scholar
  8. [Mor86]
    S. Morehouse. ARC/INFO: A Geo-Relational Model for Spatial Information. In Proceedings of 7th Int. Symposium on Computer Assisted Cartography, pages 388–398, Washington, DC, 1986.Google Scholar
  9. [WHM90]
    M.F. Worboys, H.M. Hearnshaw, and D.J. Maguire. Object-Oriented Data Modelling for Spatial Databases. Int. J. Geographic Information Systems, 4(4):369–383, 1990.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alia I. Abdelmoty
    • 1
  • Norman W. Paton
    • 1
  • M. Howard Williams
    • 1
  • Alvaro A. A. Fernandes
    • 1
  • Maria L. Barja
    • 1
  • Andrew Dinn
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computing and Electrical EngineeringHeriot-Watt UniversityRiccarton, EdinburghScotland, UK

Personalised recommendations