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An architecture for action, emotion, and social behavior

  • Joseph Bates
  • A. Bryan Loyall
  • W. Scott Reilly
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 830)

Abstract

The Oz project at Carnegie Mellon is studying the construction of artistically effective simulated worlds. Such worlds typically include several agents, which must exhibit broad behavior. To meet this need, we are developing an agent architecture, called Tok, that presently supports reactivity, goals, emotions, and social behavior. Here we briefly introduce the requirements of our application, summarize the Tok architecture, and describe a particular social agent we have constructed.

Keywords

Sense Data Context Condition Success Test Agent Architecture Natural Language Generation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph Bates
    • 1
  • A. Bryan Loyall
    • 1
  • W. Scott Reilly
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Computer ScienceCarnegie Mellon UniversityPittsburghUSA

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