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Direct estimation of local surface shape in a fixating binocular vision system

  • Jonas Gårding
  • Tony Lindeberg
Shape Estimation
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 800)

Abstract

This paper addresses the problem of computing cues to the three-dimensional structure of surfaces in the world directly from the local structure of the brightness pattern of a binocular image pair. The geometric information content of the gradient of binocular disparity is analyzed for the general case of a fixating system with symmetric or asymmetric vergence, and with either known or unknown viewing geometry. A computationally inexpensive technique which exploits this analysis is proposed. This technique allows a local estimate of surface orientation to be computed directly from the local statistics of the left and right image brightness gradients, without iterations or search. The viability of the approach is demonstrated with experimental results for both synthetic and natural gray-level images.

Keywords

Surface Orientation Binocular Disparity Fixation Plane Vertical Disparity Retinal Disparity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonas Gårding
    • 1
  • Tony Lindeberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Computational Vision and Active Perception Laboratory (CVAP) Department of Numerical Analysis and Computing ScienceRoyal Institute of Technology (KTH)StockholmSweden

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