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A theory of bisimulation for the π-calculus

  • Davide Sangiorgi
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 715)

Abstract

We study a new formulation of bisimulation for the π-calculus [9], which we have called open bisimulation (∼). In contrast with the previously known bisimilarity equivalences, ∼ is preserved by name substitution and (hence) by input prefix. The differences among all these equivalences already appear in the sublanguage without restriction: Here the definition of ∼ can be factorised into a “standard” part which, modulo the different syntax of actions, is the CCS bisimulation, and a part specific to the π-calculus, which requires name instantiation. Attractive features of ∼ are: a simple axiomatisation (of the finite terms), with a completeness proof which leads to the construction of minimal canonical representatives for the equivalence classes of ∼; an “efficient” characterisation, based on a modified transition system. This characterisation seems promising for the development of automated-verification tools and also shows the call-by-need flavour of ∼. Although in the paper we stick to π-calculus, the issues developed may be relevant to value-passing calculi in general.

Keywords

Normal Form Transition System Axiom System Mobile Process Conditional Tree 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Davide Sangiorgi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of EdinburghUK

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