Hybrid atomicity for nested transactions

  • Alan Fekete
  • Nancy Lynch
  • William E. Weihl
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 646)

Abstract

This paper defines the notion of hybrid atomicity for nested transaction systems, and presents and verifies an algorithm providing this property. Hybrid atomicity is a modular property; it allows the correctness of a system to be deduced from the fact that each object is implemented to have the property. It allows more concurrency than dynamic atomicity, by assigning timestamps to transactions at commit. The Avalon system provides exactly this facility.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan Fekete
    • 1
  • Nancy Lynch
    • 2
  • William E. Weihl
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of SydneyAustralia
  2. 2.MIT Laboratory for Computer ScienceCambridgeUSA

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