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Explanation in expert system shells: a tool for exploration and learning

  • Karen Valley
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 608)

Abstract

In this paper we analyse the explanation facilities of several expert systems using a framework based on factors relevant to the structure and content of a generated explanation. We compare this with the lack of such facilities in expert system shells, and lay out criteria for an explanation facility within an expert system shell for education. We then describe their realisation in the explores (explanation oriented expert system) shell, where domain-independent templates allow questions to be asked about the domain of any knowledge base being consulted. In response, the shell generates domain-based explanations, with further information available through follow-up questions related to the original question, the generated explanation, and the available knowledge. This facility allows a user to explore and learn about a knowledge domain, and has implications for the use of expert system shells in education.

Keywords

Knowledge Base Expert System Domain Knowledge Production Rule Explanation Dialogue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karen Valley
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Educational ResearchUniversity of LancasterLancasterUK

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