An architecture for pragmatic voice interactive systems

  • Alan W. Biermann
  • Ronnie W. Smith
Invited Talks
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 542)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan W. Biermann
    • 1
  • Ronnie W. Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceDuke UniversityDurham

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