Reasoning about uncertainty in fault-tolerant distributed systems

  • Michael J. Fischer
  • Lenore D. Zuck
Invited Talk
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 331)

Abstract

We present a temporal logic for reasoning about uncertainty in distributed systems that contain both probabilistic and nondeterministic transitions. Probabilistic transitions model randomness in the processes of the system and in the fault model. Nondeterministic transitions model lack of information about the true faulty behavior of the system and the progress of the computation. We demonstrate the naturalness of our approach by offering new analyses and solutions to some classical fault-tolerant distributed computing problems, namely the coordinated attack problem and authenticated Byzantine agreement problem.

Keywords

Temporal Logic Global State Temporal Formula Coin Toss Nondeterministic Choice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael J. Fischer
    • 1
  • Lenore D. Zuck
    • 1
  1. 1.Yale UniversityNew Haven

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