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A Reactive Approach for Solving Constraint Satisfaction Problems

  • Arnaud Dury
  • Florence Le Ber
  • Vincent Chevrier
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1555)

Abstract

We propose in this paper a multi-agent model for solving a class of Constraint Satisfaction Problems: the assignment problem. Our work is based on a real-world problem, the assignment of land-use categories in a farming territory, in the north-east of France. This problem exhibits a function to optimize, while respecting a set of constraints, both local (compatibility of grounds and land-use categories) and global (ratio of production between land-use categories). We developed amodel using a purely reactive multi-agent system that builds its solution upon conflicts that arise during the resolution process. In this paper, we present the reactive modelling of the problem solving and experimental results from two points of view: the efficiency of the problem being solved and the properties of the problem solving process.

Keywords

Farming System Goal Achievement Constraint Satisfaction Problem Reactive Approach Solve Constraint Satisfaction Problem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arnaud Dury
    • 1
  • Florence Le Ber
    • 1
    • 2
  • Vincent Chevrier
    • 1
  1. 1.LORIAVandœuvre-lés-NancyFrance
  2. 2.INRA LIABChampenouxFrance

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