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Mutation in Genetic Programming: A Preliminary Study

  • J. Page
  • R. Poli
  • W. B. Langdon
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1598)

Abstract

In this paper we examine the behaviour of the uniform crossover and point mutation GP operators [12] on the even-η-parity problem for η = 3;4; 6 and present a novel representation of function nodes, designed to allow the search operators to make smaller movements around the solution space. Using this representation, performance on the even-6-parity problem is improved by three orders of magnitude relative to the estimate given for standard GP in [5].

Keywords

Genetic Program Boolean Function Mutation Operator Crossover Operator Function Node 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Page
    • 1
  • R. Poli
    • 1
  • W. B. Langdon
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Computer ScienceUniversity of BirminghamBirminghamUK

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