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Overview of RoboCup-98

  • M. Asada
  • M. Veloso
  • M. Tambe
  • I. Noda
  • H. Kitano
  • G. K. Kraetzschmar
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1604)

Abstract

RoboCup is an increasingly successful attempt to promote the full integration of AI and robotics research. Following the astonishing success of the first RoboCup-97 at Nagoya [1], the Second Robot World Cup Soccer Games and Conferences, RoboCup-98, was held at Paris during July 2nd and 9th, 1998 at the partly same place and period of the real world cup. There are three kinds of leagues: the simulation league, the real robot small-size league, and the real robot middle-size league. The champion teams are CMUnited-98 (CMU, USA) for both the simulation and the real robot small-size leagues, and CS-Freiburg (Freiburg, Germany) for the real robot middle-size league. The Scientific Challenge Award was given to three research groups (Electrotechnical Laboratory (ETL), Sony Computer Science Laboratories, Inc., and German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence GmbH (DFKI)) for their simultaneous development of fully automatic commentator systems for RoboCup simulator league. Over 15,000 spectators and 120 international media covered the competition worldwide. RoboCup-99, the third Robot World Cup Soccer Games and Conferences, will be held at Stockholm in conjunction with the Sixteenth International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI-99) at the beginning of August, 1999.

Keywords

Obstacle Avoidance Real Robot Omnidirectional Vision Team Strategy RoboCup Rescue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Asada
    • 1
  • M. Veloso
    • 2
  • M. Tambe
    • 3
  • I. Noda
    • 4
  • H. Kitano
    • 5
  • G. K. Kraetzschmar
    • 6
  1. 1.Adaptive Machine SystemsOsaka UniversitySuita, OsakaJapan
  2. 2.Computer Science DepartmentCarnegie Mellon UniversityPittsburghUSA
  3. 3.Information Sciences InstituteUSCMarina del ReyUSA
  4. 4.Electrotechnical LaboratoryTsukubaJapan
  5. 5.Computer Science LabSony Corp.TokyoJapan
  6. 6.Neural Information ProcessingUniversity of UlmUlmGermany

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