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Qualitative Motion Representation in Egocentric and Allocentric Frames of Reference

  • Alexandra Musto
  • Klaus Stein
  • Kerstin Schill
  • Andreas Eisenkolb
  • Wilfried Brauer
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1661)

Abstract

In qualitative motion representation, frames of reference play an important role as well in measuring of the motion data as in representation and application of algorithms. This paper discusses motion representation in egocentric and allocentric frames of reference and begins with some general considerations on motion representation through qualitative distances and directions that apply to both technical and biological systems. An approach that involves incremental numeric generalization of a numerically represented motion track and subsequent transformation in a qualitative representation has advantages for technical systems, though. Last, algorithms for generalizing qualitatively represented motion tracks in egocentric and allocentric frames of reference are presented.

Keywords

Spatial Reasoning Qualitative Reasoning Representation of Spatio-temporal Knowledge Spatial Reference Frames 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexandra Musto
    • 1
  • Klaus Stein
    • 1
  • Kerstin Schill
    • 2
  • Andreas Eisenkolb
    • 2
  • Wilfried Brauer
    • 2
  1. 1.Institut für InformatikTechnische Universität MünchenMünchenGermany
  2. 2.Institut für medizinische PsychologieLudwig-Maximilians-Universität MünchenMüCnchenGermany

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